homedsgn logo homedsgn logo

Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors

By • Mar 15, 2015

Adverstisment

Stacia Smith, principal designer and founder of Homewood Interiors engaged an architectural firm specialized in historic building restorations to give a new life to this church from the late 1880s.

The now 3,800 square foot home is located in Glenelg, a rural village in Maryland, USA.

Church Conversion Homewood Interiors 01 850x581 Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors
Church Conversion Homewood Interiors 02 850x567 Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (3)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (4)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (5)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (6)

MORE INSPIRATION

Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (7)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (8)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (9)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (10)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (11)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (12)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (13)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (14)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (15)

The Church Before Renovation

Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (16)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (17)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (18)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (19)
Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors (20)

Church Conversion by Homewood Interiors:

“Charles Dickens said, “A very little key will open a very heavy door.”

“For me, a little key unlocked the creaky and warped, 10 ft doors of an old church. Those doors led to months of planning and preparation, followed by many more months of decision making, setbacks, traipsing through mud and snow, being chilled to the bone, and working harder than I knew I could”, says Stacia Smith, principal designer of Homewood Interiors.

The story of the Providence Methodist Episcopal Church in Glenelg, Maryland began in 1889, as a gift of land by the Warfield family. As the cornerstone was being laid, Benjamin Harrison was President, the Coca-Cola Company had just incorporated, and the last official bare-knuckle boxing title fight in the United States was held.

In 1961, the town’s congregations reunited to form a new church, leaving the Providence decommissioned. In 1974, a local architect gave the church a new purpose, by converted the space for residential occupancy. He and his wife, a famous potter, lived in the church for thirty years, as it became a new staple for the town’s lovers of the arts and crafts.

After decades of abandonment, interior designer Stacia Smith purchased the property in 2012.

Stacia had fallen in love with the Church’s original bones and charm. She immediately saw the potential for housing the new location for her interior design company, Homewood Interiors.

The 3,800 square foot space underwent an extensive interior and exterior renovation. “We were conscious to preserve the local landmark,” says Stacia Smith. Custom masonry stonework was sourced to match the existing stone from the late 1880s.

Though we’ve rehabilitated the exterior, we wanted to ensure that it would match the previous exterior structure. “It is important for me to remember Designer’s PR the Church and maintain its architectural integrity. Inside, we worked diligently on the interiors, preserving and restoring many of its original features.”

Entering through the oversized, custom Mahogany double doors, unveils an extraordinary blend of modern construction with Gothic Revival style. A custom 8 ft diameter glass dome, and custom windows with handcrafted gothic arches immerse the space with natural light. The dilapidated accent windows were replaced with handmade stained glass windows in Homewood Interiors company colors. Antique reclaimed heart pine floors were put down.

Ecofriendly materials were selected for the kitchen and bar area. The interior furnishing and finishes create a bespoke juxtaposition with items such as industrial chandeliers and antique finishes. The interior redesign is an exemplary representation of Stacia’s personal design aesthetic.”

Photos by: Ashley Michelle Photography and Homewood Interiors

HomeDSGN has received this project from our WeTransfer channel. Architects and interior designers are welcome to submit their work for publication.

You may use j/k/arrow keys to navigate through the articles

Share your Thoughts