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Dorset Road by Sam Tisdall Architects

By • Nov 15, 2014

Dorset Road is a private residence located in London, England.

It was designed by Sam Tisdall Architects in 2013.

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Dorset Road by Sam Tisdall Architects:

“A project for a retired couple who owned an end of terrace house with space next to it for a new house. Following long negotiations with the planning authorities, permission was granted for an exact replica of the original house externally, while allowing a new take on a familiar interior.

Although the plan is small, floor to ceiling heights are generous and the bedroom ceilings extend into the roof space.

The use of steel is limited and most of the structure of the house is timber including a central oak beam. The first floor joists are exposed and painted white and braced with traditional herringbone noggins.

The kitchen is inserted as a piece of furniture which separates living and dining spaces. A simple oak stair is lit by a tall lightwell which extends almost up to ridge height, a device which is replicated on a smaller scale in the bathroom.

The environmental strategy is simple, with the house relying on air tightness and high insulation levels. The front garden is a vegetable patch with raised beds formed from sleepers, appropriate for a terrace originally built for railway workers.

Patterned brick paving forms both the path to the front door and the rear terrace.”

Photos by: Richard Chivers

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