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Bespoke Partners Offices created by obrARCHITECTURE to motivate, inspire, and refresh on a daily basis

By • Jan 10, 2019

In the busy downtown core of San Diego, California, obrARCHITECTURE has built a stunning, brightly lit office space for Bespoke Partners that feels more like a spa retreat than a place of work.

In an innovative collaboration, obrARCHITECTURE teamed up with Studio H Design Group to collaborate on an office design for this forward thinking Californian recruiting company. This space is the corporate headquarters for all branches of the company, so productivity, comfort, and style were equally important in the list of priorities.

This entirely woman-owned and operated business is a boutique executive recruiting firm located in the city’s Little Italy nieghbourhood. The offices occupy 5,400 square feet but that entire space was recently redesigned after its original purchasing in 2016. This facelift was, of course, much more drastic than just redecorating a little or giving the walls a new coat of paint.

The luxurious interior of these offices are now a unique blend of high end marble, industrial chic looking steel and brass accents, custom designed lighting fixtures, and sliding glass doors that provide delineation but also a sense of spaciousness and shared areas. This is important, since staff often collaborate and work in various team combinations.

These glass doors were inspired by more than just a desire for widespread natural light as well. The company’s central tenet in all of their policies and goals is “transparency”, so that’s precisely what designers aimed to harness here! By including so many glass walls in the space, a sort of sound efficient but apparently open-concept atmosphere was created. This makes offices and meeting rooms appear airy and calm, letting the bright colour schemes and natural sunlight spill through from room to room in a gorgeous, cheerful way.

Perhaps the most unique aspect of the Bespoke offices is the way the company actively strives and makes space to work against common “all work and no play” mentalities. That’s why they requested that designers build a game zone right there in the office! This is accompanied by luxurious lounge areas and, on any given day, a whole workplace family of dogs running freely and happily from room to room, with lots of space to greet clients and plenty of nooks to take naps in when staff work quietly.

Photographs by Studio Maha

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Indian Booking Offices created by M Moser Associates to inspire collaboration and creative thinking

By • Jan 10, 2019

Amidst the urban hustle and bustle of Mumbai, India, brand new Booking.com Offices have been created by M Moser Associates with the intention of inspiring and motivating staff in a way that makes them actually enjoy coming into work each day!

These two companies have actually worked together numerous times which afforded them ample opportunity to foster a great working relationship even before this project came along. That wonderfully effective collaborative relationship is evidenced all over this bright, visually stunning new office space.

The original intent of both companies was to create a space that’s so interesting to be in and experience that staff, clients, and guests actually want to be there and engage with the space itself, and they more than achieved that goal! Within that priority, designers also aimed to capture the essence of the local culture surrounding the offices, making it easier for social interactions to take place and bolster productivity within the workplace.

Mumbai is a diverse city with plenty of social, visual, and economic contrasts woven into its urban cultural fabric. That’s why designers approached their design choices from such a colourful and conceptual place. In the form of furniture shapes, colour choices, and wall murals, the team tried to establish distinct themes that are representative of the people of Mumbai, since that’s who Booking.com’s services essentially enable clients to experience when they use the site.

In terms of its layout, the office is organized in a way that flows, just like a person might drift throughout their busy day. The path from singular workspaces to collaboration and group work tables to private meeting rooms and on to relaxing and social break spaces makes sense and feels comfortable. Even so, designers also made sure to create visual and artistic contrasts throughout so that these spaces do have a slightly sense of delineation.

At the same time as the colour art schemes create some distinction and flow between spaces, they also tell a story that makes experiencing, visiting, and working in the offices quite unique. The murals and displays showcase culture and social identifiers, bits of local social scenes, and homages to things like the nearby street market or work created by known artists from the area.

Besides the art, most materials used were also locally sourced. Many of the hard spaces you’ll encounter are actually made from previously fabricated and now re purposed containers, something that has been trending in urban living in several contexts all across the city. The localized nature of the materials creates a sort of raw and tactile atmosphere that’s rather specific to Mumbai.

Despite the emphasis on the office’s location, the sense of travel that the site’s services fosters and thrives on is ever present as well. In the private meeting rooms, for example, photos of different exciting Booking.com destinations are blow up the size of entire walls. The intent of these was to blur the lines between work and passion or adventure, reminding staff that their efforts enable people to experience the world.

Believe it or not, the Booking.com Mumbai offices actually only took 60 days to design and construct. Designers achieved this short timeline by streamlining processes and paying attention to the fine details of management in order to keep things time efficient. This timeframe was also helped along by the fact that so many aspects of the office’s structure and decor were localized.

Photographs by Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

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The Indian Airbnb Offices created by Space Matrix combine innovation and comfort with a sheer love of travel

By • Jan 9, 2019

The city of Gurgaon, India, recently became home to the latest innovative Airbnb offices thanks to the expertise of design and architectural firm Space Matrix.

In collaboration with Airbnb’s own Environments Team, this design crew aimed to create a genuinely unique office space that perfectly blends urban and industrial chic qualities with lively cultures and exciting, socio-cultural experiences. This was achieved by transforming an old commercial warehouse into a completely made over, very colourful, and thoroughly teamwork friendly productivity space!

Despite the desire to maintain the industrial chic look that was already built into the space thanks to the purchase of the warehouse, designers also wanted to incorporate the company’s primary values and philosophies into the look and running of the office. Of course, Airbnb’s core identity and brand revolves around the concept of being able to “belong anywhere”, so this idea ran like a backbone through the conceptualization of all other design facets.

Working in partnership with the idea of belonging anywhere was the idea that the brand itself is global, rather than specifically localized. Basically, Airbnb wanted the office to be in line with high international design standards and to incorporate some subtle or neutral schemes so that some areas boast minimal or clean finishes. The overall effect was a rather unique looking functional workspace that reflects the brand experience well.

The biggest challenge that designers faced in all of this was to keep the brand’s level of sophistication and the free-flow design they envisioned while also making sure the space speaks the same language as other Airbnb offices across the globe. In order to make sure this particular place stands out, however, they made sure to incorporate elements of much more localized culture, creating a sort of blended aesthetic and atmosphere that appears global but specialized.

Space Matrix sought to fill the Airbnb offices with an unparalleled number of co-working spaces within their free-flow structure, as this has proven effective in offices in other locations. They continued the Airbnb tradition of building themed meeting rooms that are modelled after some of the company’s more prominent listings. These let staff and clients work together while also providing those in the room with an experiential, design-oriented taste of what they’re offering around the world.

Because India is so rich with diverse culture, it was important to everyone on the team that this be explicit in some parts of the design. This is visible in some of the hand-painted artworks, ornate mixing of patterns, handmade ceramic tiles, and hand-painted local motifs, all created by markers from the directly surrounding area.

Of course, work and productivity are important in any office, but Airbnb also highly prioritizes interaction and a sense of community between employees. Space Matrix achieved this through open social and workspaces, exciting “bonus features” like a Chai bar, and various caves and duck-ins that are inherently multi-purpose and very welcoming.

As the blend of aesthetics wasn’t already unique enough, design teams also ensured that bamboo has a heavy presence in the space, using it as cladding on the walls and bulkhead. This creates a sort of outside-in effect while maintaining the international sophistication all sides of the crew were aiming for overall.

Photographs by Khoo Guo Jie at Studio Periphery

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WeWork Champs-Élysées Coworking Offices created by WeWork Coworking and Office Space to provide genuinely motivating workspaces

By • Jan 9, 2019

In the busy heart of Paris, France’s most stunningly urban and yet historical city, WeWork Champs-Élysées Coworking Offices have been created by WeWork Coworking and Office Space to give creative professionals of various kinds a genuinely collaborative and motivating space to make new concepts and develop new ideas together.

To create this fantastic space, designers and the company aimed to weave a sort of contemporary spatial narrative that’s both and innovation in design and an historical homage to the buildings its surrounded by. The actual building this office sits in has a unique history as well, since it shares an address with former American president Thomas Jefferson curing the time he served as the Minister of France!

To achieve their design goals, the crew on this project aimed to preserved the building’s already established Beaux-Arts style first and foremost. Between that and the desire for nearly pop art inspired contemporary elements inside, an interesting contrast was created that’s unlike basically any other business space in the area.

In order to bring a slightly more internationally influenced aesthetic into the space, designer s sought out another inspiration to draw from that would create lovely contrast. They chose to harness the elemental beauty of Yes Saint Laurent’s Jardins Mahorelles, located in Marrakech, Morocco.

This inspiration manifested itself in the form of terra cotta clay accents and details, painted blue concrete with pops of yellow, and the inclusion of live greenery and cactus plants in the office space. The blend of these details together created a bright and inspirational colour story for the office.

Because the accent details in the space, which is split between rooms in the old building, are already quite bright, much of the rest of the decor scheme is kept a fresh white, like a clean canvas base. The effect is that it looks very sculpture inspired in nature. This is particularly true in the casual break rooms, which even include a ping pong table!

Other pieces of furniture, like coffee tables, conference room tables, and the seating around them, are just as bright as the murals on the walls and other accent pieces, making them look a little bit pop art inspired as well. It’s the perfect blending of function and artistic style.

Because the original building is quite a historical site, minimal architectural intervention was done. Designers aimed to work with the basic features the space already had to offer rather than building new ones or taking them out. That’s why the impressive wrought iron spiral staircase and various fireplaces are situated with a small sense of reverence.

Old houses can be quite loud from room to room, so designers decided on a creative and decorative solution to improve acoustics since they didn’t want to alter the original space very far. Instead of installing mouldings or changing walls, designers opted to added thick velvet curtains that give the space character and provide a little more privacy between rooms. To balance out the heaviness of the curtains, decorative but clean, bright pendant lights and fixtures were carefully added in each room.

Photographs byTeri Bocko

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The Line Lofts by SPF: architects gives residents a modern, shared space community at home

By • Jan 8, 2019

Right in thee star studded thick of Hollywood, California, SPF: architects has create a residential project called The Line Lofts in an attempt to facilitate a more community based and social space heavy living experience!

In total, the Line Lots building is home to 82 lovely suites in one of LA’s most active up and coming neighbourhooods. Sitting tall on Las Palmas Ave, just steps away from the renowned intersection at Hollywood and Highland, extending six storeys into the air, making it the tallest residential unit in the area.

Part of the reason the building stands so high is that the plot of land designers had to work with was quite limited at its base. Besides organizing space carefully, the crew aimed to make sure the apartments were particularly well lit. Traditional ideas of standard apartment floor plans simply wouldn’t do here, however, so designers got creative instead.

Scrapping traditional floor plans meant there was more space in the design for more fluid layouts. Rather than simply linking floors to the ones above and below, multi-floor links are built through vertical corridors that let residents skip floors or travel straight up to an open air courtyard on the top of the building. This also gives a visual variation inside and removes repetition of space as people move through the building.

This particular residential project offers a plethora of unique social spaces as well. These include a workspace and wet bar immediately located in the reception, a courtyard pool up top, and even a pool lounge with floor to ceiling glass walls so that guests can get out of the sun without interrupting their visual flow, creating a clear interior-exterior relationship.

The units themselves are also designed to optimized the amount of natural light in each room. In each apartment, walls are primarily made up on the exterior sides of oversized windows with sliding sections that lead to atrium shaped balconies, one for each suite. The balconies are are recessed into the face of the building to create a smooth face that offers some shade.

In addition to space limitations, there were certain budget restrictions that designers had to work with that required them to think creatively once more in terms of materiality. Here, off the shelf products could bring the cost of construction down but selections had to be very unique and specific to make sure things still looked quite custom.

In order to give the facade of the building a little more visual interest, designers made the front facade from a combination of corrugated metal and plaster alternated one after the other to create a pattern that appears animated and flowing of its own volition. This is thanks to the smoothness of the plaster sandwiched between the roughness of the metal pieces with their metallic finish. A cohesiveness with the environment around the building is created in the way the metal pieces reflect the sky at different parts of the day.

On the ground and second floors, the units expand vertically from one to the other, rather than being arranged as single-floor units on each. This lets the spaces appear more open and gather more natural light and also affords the rooms more privacy. Building upwards rather than horizontally accounted for the limitations in space at the base of the building.

Photographs by Bruce Demonte and Lauren Moore

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ARTE S by SPARK Architects provides guests with a uniquely shaped residential escape and sunshine space

By • Jan 8, 2019

In the busy urban centre in Pinang, Malaysia, SPARK Architects recently created the visually stunning ARTE S building, a luxury residential building that resembles a spa and pool resort, giving residents a place to escape in the middle of the city.

Located in Jalan Bukit Gambier, near the better city of George Town, this project includes a pair of tall, undulating condominium towers that boast 460 residential units between them. The taller tower of the two is stands 180 metres tall and can be seen off the island from the mainland clearly in the distance.

Bukit Gambir is a lush topical mountain located right at the heart of Pengang Island, which lies off the Western coast of Malaysia. The towers are incredibly unique in the way their facade undulates at each layer. This lovely effect was intended to mimic the dramatic topography of the land surrounding the buildings, which varies between steeply rising hillsides and low coastlines.

Besides just undulating, the towers also appeared layered where the balconies sit. This mimics the mountainous landscape as well, with the graduated terrace effect mirroring the gradient of the rock faces. This effect was achieved using a construction technique called elliptical floor plating, which builders augmented with an added waveform birse-soleil that very carefully, subtly, and precisely rotated each floor a particular degree to give the buildings their twisted appearance.

Besides looking amazing in themselves, the towers are built with the intention of offering the best view of the ocean that one can find anywhere on the island. The taller of the two climbs 50 storeys high, while the shorter rises only 32. In each one, the penthouses at the top are sculpted from the final three floorplates.

On the very top of the highest tower sits a sky garden that incorporates two pebble-form recreational “resident club” pods. In the larger one, up to 60 people can be accommodated for events while the smaller hanging pod is home to luxury jacuzzi. Together the two pods create a wonderfully dramatic visual fro, the ground that acts as a signature for the building while also providing residents with an unparalleled view of George Town and the Straight of Pengang.

Inside, the units are entirely designed for flexibility and tropical living. They are open concept with no beams or poles, meaning they can be arranged in any way and at any time. The units are also specifically designed to bring in light and air naturally, eliminating the need for air conditioning and thereby saving hydro costs. In the common areas, the spaces are naturally ventilated and day-lit as well.

Around the building, several perimeter gardens have been planted at the base. These shroud the residential car park in lovely, local tropical plants that thrive in the area’s climate and would grow nearby naturally. This lovely green life contrasts beautifully with the modern appearance of the buildings and their shape, creating more texture for the eye to take in.

Of course, the pools at the base of the towers are an immediately noticeable primary feature. Their clear blue water attracts the eye and gives off a stunning reflection that mirrors the undulating visual motion of the buildings, enticing just about anyone who sets eyes on them and letting calming shapes set the atmosphere.

Photographs by LinHo

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Architecture designs Tribeca Loft for modern professionals who need a place to live, work, and socialize

By • Jan 7, 2019

In the boroughs of New York City, innovative designers Office of Architecture has designed a stunning apartment called the Tribeca Loft, harnessing the visuals of simplistic living with the unique and swanky style of The Big Apple.

In some cases, living in a “bohemian style” means sacrificing space and embracing open concept past what’s comfortable until things feel cramped or disorganized. In the Tribeca Loft, however, these things are replace by a sense of singular charm and individual privacy. This is partially due to the fact that the loft is filled with natural light and uninterrupted views of the surrounding city.

To some, loft living is quite at odds with the needs of a modern family and their demands for private space and distinct personal areas. Thanks to careful and precise organization, however, all of the amenities of this apartment have been included into an open space that was recently transformed from a 19th century landmark warehouse. Now it’s a cleverly laid out and comfortable new home for a young family!

This apartment was originally built with a much more closed off design, featuring labyrinth-like hallways and small, divided rooms. In this renovation, designers first gutted the loft down to its barest bones in order to open the space up entirely. They kept only the key structural elements and primary service zones (like the kitchen). Their hope in opening the space up was to create a better flowing relationship between public and private sectors of the home.

Now, with the dividing walls removed and more creative structures in place to delineate space such as the wooden entertainment unit, the living room, den, and kitchen areas bask in waves of natural light during the day. Despite having been opened up, however, strategic storage and furniture placement has stopped this new layout from disturbing the peace and privacy of the sleeping areas.

The creative space definers that have replaced limiting walls were chosen for their function as well as their ability to break up the “rooms”. For example, designers differentiated between certain areas using built-in accessories like free standing multi-purpose cabinetry made of walnut, several full-height sliding accordion panels, and even a wet bar.

The overall effect of this loft apartment since its transformation is one of peaceful activity. The atmosphere embraces and axudes both privacy and calm solitude but also airiness and a small emphasis on social spaces for bonding within the home.

Photographs by Matthew Williams

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The Arts District Loft by Marmol Radziner exudes simplistic creativity in the heart of Los Angeles

By • Jan 7, 2019

Smack in the middle of The Arts District in sunny Los Angeles, California, stands a building that’s home to the Art District Loft, a recently completed project designed and carried out by Marmol Radziner.

Within this project, designers altered a 2000 square foot condominium that was originally part of the Toy Factory Lofts. These were a residential initiative created in a 1924 warehouse in Downtown LA’s Art District. Within the alterations, designers removed many partitions in order to combine rooms and create more open concept spaces. One such room combination resulted in a beautiful master suite.

Besides the bedrooms, the living room was also reconfigured and fitted with new casework. Additionally, the kitchen, bathroom, and powder room were all renovated, just to make sure the entire loft got a bit of a contemporary update. Although designers wished to work with a much more open floor plan, they also aimed to create distinct areas for entertaining and socializing, making it easy for owners to have guests over.

Builders chose to create a more flowing and cohesive feeling between the interior of the apartment and the street outside as well. This was done primarily through the installation of stunning floor-to-ceiling windows that are unlike anything the original lofts had featured previously.

In order to keep things open, airy, filled with light, and flowing but also still give different areas a bit of distinction, furnishings and built-in features were used like markers. For example, a custom bookcase made with three bays that rotate 90 degrees each was placed strategically in order to mark the border between the living room and the master suite. When the bays are turned to open, natural light floods both spaces, but turning the case back closes the bedroom off a little more privately.

The existing space is quite natural but industrial chic thanks to the use of concrete. This exposed material is used on the floor, walls, and ceiling, contrasting very well indeed with the inviting slightly more modern interior furnishings designers selected within the space. These are made up of an assortment of wood and metal finishes with interesting textures being prioritized. The contrast softens the space and warms the atmosphere up a little.

A primarily grey colour palette helps to warm the space up as well! Black is also heavily featured to create even more contrast with the concrete and the result is comfortable to look at but also quite streamlined and sophisticated.

Photographs by Jessie Webster

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German Main East Side Lofts created by 1100 Architect as an artistic update to a pre-war building

By • Jan 4, 2019

In the centre of the beautiful Germany city of Frankfurt, a pre-war residential building has been given facelift in order to not just update it but transform it into a piece of veritable street art. Main East Side Lofts by 1100 Architect attracts the eye and plays with visuals in a way that’s very unique indeed.

The Main East Side Lofts are part of a mixed-use building that stands high in a rapidly changing neighbour undergoing several update projects in the last few years. Originally, the building was intended to house a factory, but the design was never completed due to the outbreak of the First World War. Instead, it was used as a hospital first and worker’s housing later on.

In this updating project, designers work with Frankfurt’s Landmarks Department and settled on an acceptable plan that involved transforming the existing building, as well as creating a contemporary addition of equal size. To make the two parts look like a cohesive whole, the new addition matches the original building in volume, rhythm, and proportion but looks as thought that half has been reimagined in a modern language and with much newer materials, creating a beautiful overall contrast.

Now that the building has been finished, the facade makes the cityscape more interesting. Inspired by the original mansard roof, it was conceived and built like a continuous wrapped, meaning that the outer surface of the building seamlessly folds along the height of the structure’s face and stretches upward to form the roof.

On every surface, the facade uniformly features a cement fibreboard with brightly coloured reveals in the window insets that serve as a fun highlight from a distance. The panels of these coloured sections bend to reflect light and capture a range of visual tones all across the width and height of the building’s face. Because of its modern character and shape, this colour popping facade creates a sort of contemporary foil around the landmark structure it was added to.

Because it sits on the harbour, designers also wanted to make sure the new residential part of the building was sound proof and peaceful on the inside. This was partially achieve by careful material choices that help mitigate outside sounds. Acoustical double windows set deep into thick walls, for example, help deflect sound vibrations.

Inside, the apartments are structured like lofts that place a lot of importance of open space and flexibility. Of course, key characteristics of the original historic structure, like the high ceilings and the large double windows, were mimicked in the additional for lovely continuity, creating cohesiveness despite the non-traditional floor plans.

Photographs by Nikolas Koenig

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The Gouse , a uniquely named residence by Marta Nowicka, is a beautiful houses where a garage used to be

By • Jan 4, 2019

In the heart of London, England, innovative designer Marta Nowicka has created The Gouse, a lovely three story residence that stands on the site of a former garage in Dalston.

The name of this project was chosen by combining the words “house” and “garage” but that’s not the only way that Nowicka decided to pay tribute to the plot’s original purpose. The exterior walls of the house are also glad in cedar shingles, similar to the way the old garage that once stood in its place would have been!

According to Nowicka, the site of The Gouse was a plot that she purchased online without ever even seeing it first. Something about it just emanated workability. The plot itself measures only 45 square metres and is surrounded on all sides by the back gardens of its neighbouring Victorian buildings with old fashioned terraces, except for the side where it faces onto a the road.

Due to the limited space the designer had to work with, teams decided to extend the building upwards, adding rooms vertically rather than horizontally. That’s why the house stands three stories from the ground rather than the more traditional two! This includes a basement featuring light wells to keep the bottom floor lit and bright.

The Gouse has several other extremely unique features as well. These include glass floor sections that show from one storey to another, as well as a “living wall”. This vertical plant display sits on the first floor and establishes a sense of an indoor-outdoor living space and a cohesiveness of the house with the environment around it.

When The Gouse was first being conceptualized, designers decided that they’d like to prioritize two goals: preserving the “end of garden character” the original garage had and improving the way that the new building meets the street and looks from the sidewalk to passersby. Character was established partially by including a few random treasures found in an old shed on the plot back into the new building, preserving the area’s history in a contemporary way.

Inside the Gouse, very large, carefully framed windows give lovely views of the neighbouring gardens around the plot. In the master bedroom, which sits just past the entrance and first corridor, an entirely glazed glass wall faces out onto a small exterior patio space that is enclosed for privacy and peacefulness by a perforated brick wall.

On the basement floor, guests will encounter a beautiful wood burner that adds to the already shed-inspired atmosphere of The Gouse’s decor. This burner creates a nostalgic warmth and smoky scent that reminds one of burning autumn leaves.

Photographs by Voytek Ketz

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Tacuri House by Gabriel Rivera is a fully open concept residential haven in Ecudaor

By • Jan 3, 2019

On the outskirts of Quito, in sunny Ecuador, the new Tacuri House was created by Gabriel Rivera with a stunning open concept living ideology in mind.

Besides its visual appeal, one of the most interesting facts about Tacuri House was that it was build entirely around the trees that already existed on its plot of land. Not a single tree was felled in its construction process. Instead, designers protected the trees that were already there intentionally and worked carefully between and amidst them so as not to disturb them or their roots.

More specifically, Tacuri House (known locally as Casa Tacuri) is located in a little parish called Nayon. This town is known far and wide for its absolutely stunning views of the Cumbaya Valley, as well as for its flourishing Algarrobo trees, which are native to that area specifically. These trees attract an abundance of singing birds, making the town feel like a natural getaway despite the fact that it’s actually only a few minutes away from a larger, more bustling city.

In addition to working around the trees that have always called its site home, Tacuri House also slopes along with the land, continuing the ways in which it was built to respect the natural environment it was nestled into. Its unique U-shaped floor plan consists of three volumes in total, arranged very precisely around a central courtyard. These volumes are connected with covered glass walkways.

The exterior walls of the house create a lovely colour and texture contrast because of the way they’re made from concrete and honey-toned wood. An additional but slightly less stark contrast lies in the parts of the house that are made from beautifully clean glazed glass framed in black metal.

In the first wing of the house, which is the tallest, the ground floor provides dwellers with a parking garage tucked subtly behind a fence near the street. Up a flight of sturdy concrete stairs, designers placed the dining area, living room, and kitchen together on the first building’s upper level. Here, a part of the roof is lifted and a clerestory window is inset for lots of natural sunlight.

Perpendicular to this first building is the wing of the house containing all the private areas. The sprawling master suite sits on the top level here, while the bottom floor of the second volume provides space for two slightly smaller bedrooms and a cozy den. The master suite up top features lovely glazed walls all around which open onto a sizeable terrace. Because it sits higher in the house, the windows of the suite gives it the impression that you’re actually sleeping high up in the trees.

The third and smallest wing of the house sits at the back of the courtyard. Here, you’ll find a small but pleasant and well naturally lit studio. The atmosphere here is simple yet warm. Like the other rooms, it has a concrete ceiling, wooden accents, and a few contemporary decor pieces place strategically to catch the eye. The floor to ceiling window theme carries on all throughout the house.

Photographs by Bicubik

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Teph Inlet House by Omar Gandhi Architect provides a stunning waterfront escape in Eastern Canada

By • Jan 3, 2019

Perched beautifully on the coast in Nova Scotia, Canada, Teph Inlet house was created by Omar Gandhi Architect as a sun filled family holiday home for enjoying warm summers in once that notorious Canadian winter melts away for the year.

One of the most notable features of this home is the entirely glazed glass ground floor. This visually open structure gives guests an unparalleled view of the Nova Scotian coast. Built specifically for a young family, the house sits right besides the ocean in the small Eastern Canadian village of Chester.

Two separate buildings sit on the property of Teph Inlet house. The first is a two storey main house with full amenities and the second is a smaller guest house. Both buildings are cuboid in their shape and each one faces onto a stunning swimming pool with a paved outdoor space surrounding it and spots where guests can enjoy both sun and shade, depending on their preference.

A little further back from the pool house, a garage lines up along its side, creating another outdoor space. This is a linear shaped sports area where guests and family can enjoy a whole plethora of fun outdoor activities, the most exciting of which is definitely the zip line! Beyond that, a rear terrace is open to the harbour filled with boats while tall trees give a neighbouring grassy plot some cool shade from the sun.

As if the house didn’t feature enough outdoor space already, the fantastic floor to ceiling glass panels we mentioned earlier, which make up the walls of the whole ground floor in the main house, actually slide back to open that storey entirely to the fresh air. A lovely stone deck sits right on their other side of those sliding doors, blending with the living and dining rooms and kitchen.

Also on the ground floor is an en suite bedroom and bathroom that’s perfect for guests because a pocket door can slide out and separate that part of the house entirely, almost like an additional private volume. There and in the main stairwell, more double-height glass walls give the house plenty of natural light no matter the time of year.

Up a set of floating white oak stairs, which sit underneath some stunning sky lights, is a master suit that features a walk-in closet and its own bathroom. Three more bedrooms and two additional bathrooms call the upper storey home as well, making Teph Inlet house a fantastic place for hosting plenty of summertime guests.

The colour palette and decor schemes are both clean, calm, and befitting of a coastal holiday home. Teph Inlet house features herringbone patterned light oak flooring, countless stark white surfaces throughout, and details made in stone and natural tile. These keep things looking clean and simplistic without being void of decorative style.

Photographs by Ema Peter

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Casa Bedolla by P+0 Arquitectura blends into the land in the countryside of Mexico

By • Jan 2, 2019

Casa Bedolla, a lovely little house designed and build in a rather complex terrain between mountains and trees by P+0 Arquitectura, calls Nuveo Leon, Mexico home.

Nestled amongst the cedars and oaks, this home spans only 200 square feet despite the sprawling land around it. This is because the rocky topography presents building challenges that these particular designers were innovative enough to work around wonderfully here, but didn’t want to tempt too hard by making the home too expansive.

From the outset, designers of Casa Bedolla aimed to work with the land, respecting the terrain and working around the existing trees in order to preserve them. The rocky house sits two storeys high, with two separate areas featured on the ground floor; one for private areas and another for social spaces.

These areas appear to float over the ravine below thanks to the way the structure has been firmly anchored into the mountainside. The angle it sits at allows for the collection of water runoff near where beams support the main wall, which is a monolithic slab of concrete with a local stone facade.

Although the house appears quite sturdy and thick walled, two of the walls are actually perforated. This lets warm, fresh air ventilate the house naturally at the same time as it affords stunning views of the mountains and forest through the holes in the stone. You’ll see the walls we mean upon entering the courtyard out front.

Another slab extending from the roof neat the courtyard provides the area with a little bit of shade down below. This is where you’ll find the garage and parking area. Close to the high extension, a terrace is formed at the top of the house, turning the hard roof into a social space akin to a solarium that sits at the top of a linear staircase.

Inside, the rooms are actually quite open concept on each floor. Rather than building more thick walls to divide interior spaces, designers strategically placed furniture to delineate between rooms of differing functions. This makes the home’s interior quite customizable as the family’s needs a personal tastes change in the future.

Throughout the house, generous windows provide natural light and dissolve the separation the thick walls provide, creating a better indoor-outdoor relationship. This co-existence mimics that of modern and traditional construction techniques that are clearly present in the house itself; there’s a sense of dialogue between all facets of your surroundings while you’re there.

Photographs by FCH Fotografia

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