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Contemporary Brazilian SR32 Residence created by HARDT Planejamento created on a slope overlooking a landmark park

By • Jun 14, 2019

Nestled into the woodland areas of Curitiba in Brazil, the beautiful and newly completed SR32 Residence created by HARDT Planejamento was a chance to test the design team’s skills in building on sloping land and lowering process impacts on nature while still creating a contemporary living space.

Covering 240 square metres of land, the house sits singularly on a slope; and standalone structure that is not built onto the boundaries of another building like so many in the nearby local areas are. The vantage point at which the house sits affords it a view of the nearby Bacacheri park, a local landmark, that is nothing short of breathtaking.

From the outset, designers decided to incorporate this closeness to such lush nature right into the home’s layout and structural plan. Besides aiming to include an amount of greenery within the home’s decor itself, they also wanted to emphasize those green views as much as possible. This is how the finished product ended up featuring its three full glass facade walls!

Of course, the house is still a residential home and (even legally) that requires a degree of privacy, so designers also custom built a useful blond gable on the south side, where passers by might otherwise see into the house a little too easily. Elsewhere, however, the home is almost entirely visually open to the greenery surrounding it.

The view wasn’t the only thing designers wanted to work with! They also opted to work with the last of the land instead of against it, incorporating the slop of the hill into the home’s structure and layout. They did this largely by deeming the highest point of the slope as the perfect spot for the ground floor and using the slope downward as an opportunity to build a basement below.

Besides the basement on the slope, the rest of the house is arranged vertically on top of the ground floor. This gives certain rooms a different but equally stunning view down into the park. While the basement plays home to a garage and storage space, the ground floor features social areas and the kitchen and dining room. Upstairs, you’ll encounter personal rest space, as well as a comfortable rooftop patio for family activities, hosting guests, and relaxing with that infamous view.

Access to each floor of the house is provided by one of the design elements that actually contrasts greatly with its naturally surroundings, as well as different more neutrally toned features of the house. This is a steel staircase all along the one closed wall, extending from the basement completely upwards through the ground floor, past the bedrooms, and right to the rooftop.

Of course, the square footage of the actual ground level is quite small, even though that means the house isn’t thanks to the way it expands upwards. This small base means that the goal of building a strong green element right into the house wasn’t as easy as it might have been otherwise. This is why designers chose to not only build a small garden on the round level, but also allow it to climb up the side of the house onto the rooftop patio and barbecue area as well.

Whatever other small spaces in the house that don’t feature their own elements of greenery, like the bathroom and a small ground floor office off the kitchen, are purposely situated to face the back garden so that they don’t miss out entirely. This ties the atmosphere of the house into its park and woodland view, making it feel pleasantly engulfed in nature.

In terms of materiality, most of the things used in the home’s construction are natural and were locally sourced. This is perhaps most evident in the heavy use of wood within in the home and in the outdoor spaces, but is also true in the exposed bring and many of the metal details. The polished concrete that makes up the base of the ground floor was locally sourced as well.

Across the floors and up the stairs, both inside and out (with the exception of where polished concrete was used as an alternative), pressure treated pine with a burned finish, a wood that suits both summer and winter, was used. A sense of cohesiveness was created when the leftovers of this wood were used for the countertops in the kitchen and several tables through the house. Pops of colour in the decor scheme, mostly in yellow and blue, create a stunning contrast with this wood.

The heavy emphasis on glass and feelings of limitlessness through the house do, of course, do more than just provide a constant good view. The glass walls in most areas, as well as a glass ceiling over the staircase, also ensure that the interior of the house is constantly well lit. This, in turn, helps increase the home’s energy efficiency during the day.

Photos by Jefferson Carollo Filho

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Curvy Canadian Quetzal Bar created by Partisans to celebrate Mexican cuisine

By • Jun 14, 2019

In the heart of downtown Toronto, Canada, innovative social space designers Partisans have returned to the area following a few successful previous projects, this time to complete the interior renovation of a restaurant space to make the new Quetzal Bar!

Quetzal Bar is not these designers’ first project in the neighbourhood. A number of years back, they were also the driving force behind Bar Raval, a critically acclaimed Spanush “pinto boite”. Now, the same design team has reunited with the same food and drink experts to create a second collaboration with a unique structure and atmosphere distinct from their first.

Quetzal Bar was conceptualized to celebrate and preserve Mexican recipes and cooking techniques from across the country’s various diverse regions. Many of the recipes selected from the menu area generations old and have been passed down with unique changes from family member to family member over the years, making for a truly authentic and delicious dining experience.

The space that the restaurant calls home is a stunning vaulted room that pays homage to certain eras of traditional Mexican architecture. Despite being small, the space feels luminous and welcoming, partially thanks to the lighting choices made by designers and how the light bounces off the unique curved ceiling, and partially thanks to the fragrant, mouthwatering scents wafting from the kitchen.

To make those delicious traditional meals happen, designers and resident chefs alike decided that it would be best to power the College Street bar entirely by a wood-burning fire. This isn’t always typical of how Mexican restaurants cook their meals, even though it’s common practice “back home”. In this way, Quetzal Bar is redefining how Mexican food is both experienced and prepared in Canada itself.

From the outset, restaurant owners stated that they wanted the interior structure of Quetzal Bar to hearken back to the billowing tarps of the market stalls in Mexico. This is where the curvature of the rippling ceiling’s shape came from, as well as the emphasis on organic Oaxacan pottery in the decor details.

Letting these shapes speak volumes within the room, designers chose to keep much of the rest of the space quite simple. The materiality of the furnishings and interiors follows suit, being primarily made of wood, concrete, and plaster. Overall, the space feels breezy and welcoming, blending two cultures in a unique and festive way.

The bar, of course, isn’t free of local Canadian influence either. Owners chose Canadian maple from right there in Ontario to punctuate the rolling ceiling in places that its unique design needed additional support. The concrete of the floor is also locally sourced, letting the Canadian influence ground the space while the Mexican cuisine carries diners away.

Although it is very decorative and reminiscent of Mexican architecture, the ceiling we’ve raved so much about also has a very practical functionality as well. At the same times is it reminds diners of market stalls, or perhaps even snow drifts or sculpted ivory, as employees have suggested, it also hides the industrial air circulation system the restaurant requires to safely ventilate the grill, particularly on bust nights (which there are many of).

The stunning wooden bar is another place where the Canadian element of the space gets to shine. Here, guests can order either cocktails or ceviche, stopping at whichever side they need like they truly are at a Mexican market visiting different stalls. Diners might also visit the comal corner, where the traditional clay ovens used in Mexico are set up for all to see. These spots break down the division between cook and diner, making the meal something to be experienced rather than just consumed.

Photos by Doublespace Photography

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Australian Maximus Offices created by Siren Design to give business consultants a dynamic, modern workspace

By • Jun 13, 2019

In the heart of Melbourne, Australia, innovative designers at Siren Design have recently completed an entire office wide renovation on the newly improved and wonderfully contemporary Maximus Offices!

From the outset, the goal of this renovation was to improve the sense of space for employees. Company heads wanted their business management consultancy team to feel a sense of individuality even while the office itself bears several similarities with the Sydney location, for the sake of cohesiveness and brand consistency.

The first decision designers made was to open up the space completely, both in terms of its layout and in terms of its own framework. Now, the floor plan of each room is open concept and the “bones” of the building, in its supports, ceiling, frame, and details are visible in a way that, rather than looking unfinished, looks minimalist and modern industrial chic.

Another update that had perhaps the biggest effect on employee moods and productivity was the decision to open up as much of each room as possible to ensure that just about every corner is flooded with natural sunlight. This contrast well with the raw elements of the redone building even as it lifts the spirits of those working in the offie and creates and inviting atmosphere typical of more modern office spaces in wider Melbourne.

Another priority shift in the office’s redesign was the way designers opted to explore a sort of blurring of space and traditional boundaries between work spaces, break rooms, and the parts of an office that visitors would normally see. By amalgamating some of these things in one place, keeping designated areas but not closing them off, designers and company heads aimed to make the space more collaborative, friendly in its professionalism, diverse, and welcoming in the way the space works and flows. There’s also a touch of novelty here; now, visitors see some consultants at work to some degree, giving them a sort of “behind the scenes” sneak peek.

Overall, the whole environment was created to feel relaxed. In the entryway, guests are immediately encountered with a welcoming space that, though separate for employee concentration, gives people an easy view into some of the collaborative workspaces. This immediate connection is great for outside collaboration as well as creativity.

Increasing the option of collaborative spaces for the employees themselves was a huge priority as well. The first way in which the company decided to work towards this was by designing a shared cafe, situated near the entrance where guests might join. This space is also often used as a training zone for new employees, making it one of the most diversely used spaces in the whole office.

Now, as we mentioned, the Melbourne space is cohesive with the branding and style of the Sydney location, but it still has its own charm and individualized style, as influenced by its particular employees. Though company values and colour schemes are consistent between the two cities, the new Melbourne spot has a slightly more relaxed, almost residential feel. Where Sydney is rather sophisticated, Melbourne is built to make people feel a little bit more at home.

Photos by Cheyne Toomey

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Craftsman’s Farmhouse created by Brandon Architects to provide a beautifully blended and unique family experience near the seaside

By • Jun 13, 2019

Along the stunning Californian coastlines in the seaside town of Corona del Mar, Brandon Architects has recently finished a stunningly modern take on the idea of building one’s dream country farmhouse, this time with a beachy twist.

The careful craftsmanship that went into planning, building, and decorating this home is evident before you even step through the door. Inspired by the country farmhouses found elsewhere in the country, designers chose to recreate and modernize the aesthetic of such a thing a little bit, making it exude that down-home atmosphere in a way that still suits its seaside location.

The plot on which the house sits, which is nestled onto the coastline of a little Californian beach town called Cameo Shores, is the stuff dreams are made of. The newly built home relies on natural, traditional materials and architectural techniques for that authentic farmhouse feel, particularly on the outside. Designers then used certain areas of the interior to introduce a contemporary element, creating a perfect blend of eras and aesthetics- all while emphasizing those unparalleled seaside views!

While modern technology adorns the kitchen, bathrooms, and shared living spaces and beach life rules the outdoor living spaces, what the designers called “old-world craftsmanship” is evident in the home’s exterior and all of the bedrooms especially. The effect is a truly unique aura of coastal living spanning across the home’s five bedrooms (which are accompanied by six and a half bathrooms). That’s over 7,248 square feet of living space!

Because of the varying design elements that have been incorporated in one place here, the living spaces provided are particularly welcoming and warm feeling. They’re also literally pleasantly warm thanks to the way glass doors, floor to ceiling glazed windows, and skylights allow natural sunlight to flood just about every corner of the house, helped along by the stunning open concept layout. Air circulation and ventilation benefits from this as well, making the home a little less reliant on heating and cooling systems and therefore a little more energy efficient.

The open concept layout we’ve mentioned so many times is particularly noticeable in the ground floor’s primary social spaces. Here, the cozy living room blends seamlessly into a formal dining room with lots of space for guests, and on into a stunning chef’s kitchen that features an island for easy flow but a bit of visual delineation. On the edges, you’ll find a large pantry and a quiet home office, which is afforded a bit more space to itself without feeling too isolated.

The living room itself is a pleasant blend of contemporary and rustic elements, truly embodying the term “modern farmhouse”. It is fully equipped with stylish furniture and cutting edge media and entertainment systems, but it also features reclaimed wood ceiling beams and some stunning built-in wooden cabinetry that surrounds a gorgeous fireplace. It really is the perfect spot for gathering the family to unwind together after a long, active day.

Just in case relaxing outside is more your speed, there’s a sprawling private terrace that sashays guests and dwellers out to a sparkling negative-edge swimming pool that catches glorious amounts or sunlight and warmth. This pool ends in a heated spa pool and both bodies of water are positioned perfectly for soaking in island and ocean views that are nothing short of mesmerizing.

Just in case you’e looking for a statement piece or two ta really scream “farmhouse” to you, we’d love to direct your attention to the large wooden doors featured in both garages, each one made from locally sourced reclaimed wood. We think you’ll also appreciate the very authentic looking reclaimed wood sliding barn door that gives owners the option of closing off the dining room. This door isn’t just built as a simple, stylized element inspired by a bar door; it is literally a barn door that designers installed to work like it would have in its original location.

Photos by Jeri Koegel Photography

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Sustainable Lakehouse created among the trees by Johnston Design Group

By • Jun 12, 2019

Nestled in the trees above a lake in Keowee Springs, in the heart of South Carolina, innovative designers at Johnston Design Group recently completed the unique, cutting edge, and rather divine looking Sustainable Lakehouse.

What makes the house so incredibly unique is the way designers combined the most modernized and state of the art home sustainability technology with architectural techniques and decor choices that give both the facade and interior a pleasant, nearly old fashioned feeling aesthetic despite the fact that the house is newly built.

One of the primary foals in building the house was to create a space where the stunning views its location is afforded can be seen from just about any place, inside or out. This explains the many beautiful outdoor living areas and balconies varying in size, as well as the large windows found all throughout, on every floor.

Because the house sits atop a rocky hill, the view of the surrounding greenery leading down to the lake’s edge is practically unparalleled. It stands several storeys high in addition to the heigh it’s already afforded, meaning that every different window and balcony or outdoor living space it offers gives guests a slightly different angle or view from which to enjoy soaking in the countryside.

In terms of its aesthetic and decor scheme, designers have stated that their choices in materiality and style were inspired by the English Arts & Crafts movement. The intention is for the home to appear hands-on, stately in a way that might have been built by one’s own efforts, and comfortable, while still bearing an air of sophistication.

Regarding the systems that make the home so sustainable as to be name after its leading features, designers installed systems and analyzed local standards in order to make the way the house runs and saves or uses energy meet the USGBC LEED for Home list of standards and requirements. This means the building is truly one that qualifies as being part of the “green living” movement.

Entering the house through a beautiful reclaimed wood door, the first thing guests encounter is the impressive great room. This is comfortable and traditional looking in a comfortable way, and leads right outside onto a beautiful ground level terrace. This is the first spot where picture perfect views of the lake are offered. On chillier days, one can stay inside and see a similar view through high, bright limestone cased windows.

On one side of the great room is a towering floor to ceiling fireplace clad in the same coursed limestone featured on the walls. The chimney section of this is adorned with a decorative and ornate looking 19th century iron door imported from Italy. This feature makes the space look nearly medieval, anchoring the sitting area in a space that, as you move towards the kitchen, starts to look a little more contemporary.

In fact, the energy efficiency systems that start in the kitchen and move throughout the rest of the house are so contemporary and up to standard that the house was awarded the US Green Building Council LEED Silver Certification. There might only be a few telltale visual markers of these things on first glance, but that’s part of the charm!

As you begin to move throughout the house, you might notice just how diverse but still rooted in nature and tradition the materials used in building the house are. The roof is a dark slate that ties things together visually. The walls and porch are a smooth limestone accented with intentionally weathered but impressive cedar siding on the inside. Other details are finished and added in metals; in different places, you’ll encounter copper and reclaimed wrought iron.

Both outside and inside the house, most lighting, heating, and water systems are solar powered, thanks to subtle panels installed on the side of the slate roof that gets the most light year-round. The house also has a rainwater harvesting system and Low-E aluminum clad windows.

In addition to the things that make the house energy efficient and globally low impact, designers also made several choices during the building and landscaping processes that lowered the localized impact on the environment. They made very intention choices in sourcing natural materials from the local area and they also used native plants that fit the plot’s ecosystem in putting together the yards and gardens.

Perhaps the best place to truly appreciate the mountain lake view we’ve raved so much about is the middle terrace, which is a cool stone spot amongst the trees that feels just secluded enough to be relaxed but not so much that it appears isolated. Here, a wonderfully old fashioned wrought iron staircase spirals upwards to the patio doors of the master bedroom, truly resembling something out of a fairytale.

Photos by Rachael Boling Photography

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Texan Hill Retreat created by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture to combine contemporary living with the true feeling of the state

By • Jun 12, 2019

In the charming desert climate of Llano, Texas, a stunningly authentic and yet beautifully modern escape called the Texan Hill Retreat has been finished for a family by creative teams at Michael Hsu Office of Architecture.

The large two story holiday home boasts several immediately noticeable walls of glass. Whether you’re standing outside or in, these will undoubtedly be one of the first things you’ll notice because of the way they contrast with and add and intriguingly modern feel to the otherwise traditional looking stone and brickwork of the home’s materiality.

These windows do more than just look nice in the walls, of course. They also provide breathtaking views of the warm desert greenery surrounding the house and its land, as well as increasing the home’s energy efficiency by providing the rooms inside with plenty of natural daylight and passive heating on cooler days, making it rely less on heating and cooling systems.

In the great room, which you’ll encounter nearly right off the entryway, the impressive windows we’re referring to are actually double heigh, as is the room’s ceiling. This makes the shared living space feel large, airy, and in tune with the landscape around the house.

A suspended metal fireplace that appears to float over a freestanding concrete hearth sits in the centre of the living room, with chairs arranged all the way around for coziness and easy socializing. The shape and construction of this central piece appears quite unique and modern, which makes it all the more interesting that the materiality of the same piece is quite rustic and old fashioned.

The use of natural, rustic materials throughout the house continues, rather than stopping with the walls and the fireplace. Wood siding is a heavy feature throughout the whole ground floor, lending another layer of rusticity to the home. This contrasts well with the furnishings that aren’t styled along the same vein; designers specifically chose more contemporary looking pieces in modern, alternative shapes to make a comfortable but attention grabbing dissonance that really works.

Of course, that might sound like a lot to pack into one decor scheme, but they’ve made it happen without creating a space that’s too busy or a look that’s overwhelming or tacky. The layout of the house is simple and sensical and so are the details of the decor scheme. In fact, some rooms in this clean, streamlined yet traditional home border on minimalism, particularly those with polished concrete floors. These spaces, however, as given extra character by the inclusion of a piece or two of local culture decorum.

Like the windows, the concrete floors we mentioned above do more than just look nice. They are also actually part of the passive heating and cooling in the house that makes it less reliant on active energy using systems. At the same time as they make everything look smooth and clean, they also keep the home cool in hot weather.

With plenty of comfortable bedrooms and bathrooms, lots of yard space leading down to a local lake, and more than one space both inside and outside in which to sit and spend some bonding time with family and friends, this house truly is the perfect spot for not only unwinding with loved ones but also getting a feel for the local Texan experience while you’re at it.

Photos by Casey Dunn Photography

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Office Rooftop is a stunning open concept workspace created by Studio Combo on top of a theatre

By • Jun 11, 2019

In the heart of the city of Paris in France, creative design teams atStudio Combo have created a unique open concept working office with an even more unique location: the rooftop of an old French theatre!

This contemporary office, designed for a group of freelancers and contractors who desired a professional but shared cost workspace outside their homes, was built on top of the Élysée Montmartre theatre, which is a monument on the back of the historical Sacre Coeur.

Rather than detracting from the history of the buildings, it brings a sense of charming modern feeling to the day to day activities that happen in and around the theatre. The look of the windowed walls, which provide workers with a view of the city that is nothing short of stellar, contrast beautifully with the otherwise classic architecture in a way that is downright fascinating.

From the outset, designers were determined that this office wouldn’t be anything like the standard corporate offie most people are used to, for reasons besides just its location. That’s why  the office is comfortably open concept instead of having a central isolated office and cubicles like most other corporate offices might feature.

Even just visually, the office is nearly a work of art compared to some. Its geometric shapes and high windowed walls with metallc frames allow the perfect amount of sunlight into the space even as the facade twinkles in that same light during the day. Spanning only 300 square feet, the offices look almost as thought they’re floating on the rooftop, like an ethereal, playful tetragon.

Inside the office, white painted metal frames have been left exposed supporting the roof like a subtle, lighter take on the current industrial chic trend. Desks are angled well compared to where the sun might hit computer screens and both collaborative and individualized work spaces are organized in a way that makes the flow of people and ideas simple and effective.

While a wood floor keeps things comfortable and homey, white furnishings keep things looking contemporary and streamlined in a way that suits the historical context of the office’s location specifically because it’s not what you’d expect to find sitting up on top of the theatre at all!

Photos by Guillaume Guerin

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Luxury Lake Lodge created by Ward-Yonge Architecture to provide an old fashioned family getaway

By • Jun 11, 2019

In the lush woodland greenery of Lake Tahoe in California, the Luxury Lake Lodge was recently completed by Ward-Yonge Architecture for a family seeking a sophisticated holiday home that might also help them share authentic, old fashioned experiences and benefit from nature with their friends and loved ones.

Built like a gorgeous sprawling lodge, this impressive stone home is located just north of primary Lake Tahoe itself. Spanning 8,900 square feet, its traditional looking expanse lets guests take in gorgeous woods filled and lakeland views from just about every room in the house. The location is secluded but relaxed rather than isolated, while the atmosphere inside the house is grand but comfortable.

Boasting five bedrooms, five fireplaces, a four car garage, and more than one stunning outdoor living space, the house is more than equipped to host all the guests the owners could wish for. The central spiral staircase that leads from one floor to the other is an attention grabbing piece every time, but not as heavily as the stunning main terrace that gives easy access to swim in the lake.

On the outside, the house features traditional Vermont style slate roofing, high copper panelled turrets, and a stone exterior that, despite being quite typical of the area, is breathtaking in this layout. Massive reclaimed wooden beams frame the house and mirror the wood in the door while wrought iron details make up the metal features. The material choices in this house were intentional, designed to reflect old fashioned craftsmanship of eras gone by.

Part of the appeal of the natural materiality this luxury home has to offer is that it blends wonderfully into the overall scenery and manages not to interrupt the view from other places nearby. It suits the landscape but, once you’ve laid eyes on it and identified its formidable structure, you can’t hardly look away from the feat of architecture that makes up its different parts.

The way that the same materiality follows you inside is intentional and impactful as well. The stone makes things feel authentically rustic and suitable for the setting while the wood draws together a send of warmth. Ornate decor pieces and state of the art amenities create a blending of aesthetics and establish that sense of luxury designers were aiming for from the outset.

Up the winding staircase, expansive bedrooms with kind sized beds covered in soft cushions make every guest feel like the laird of a medieval royal lodge. Despite the fact that most decor is set to adult tastes there are certain elements, like the authentically carpeted wood and wrought iron bridge that leads from one wing of the upstairs to the other, lined on each side with ornate wrought iron railings like something from a castle, is sure to enamour even the youngest visitors.

Photos by Vance Fox Photography

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Daodao Coffee built by HAD Architects& EPOS in Japan as a relaxation space in the middle of a busy day

By • Jun 10, 2019

Smack in the middle of the shopping district in Chengdu, China, a lovely two story coffee shop called Daodao Coffee was recently complete by HAD Architects& EPOS with the intention of giving weary shoppers, groups of friends, and quiet individuals a place to gather and find that they’re looking for in one convenient place, without interrupting one another.

The coffee shop is an interesting place to look at the moment you walk through the door. This is primarily because it is at once decorative and also minimalist. This might sound oxymoronic but let us explain; the visual interest of the shop lies in the fact that the very structures or furnishings and the way space is divided is so visually pleasing already that hardly any decor need be added (besides some lovely greenery, of course).
The coffee shop gets quite a lot of traffic thanks to its location in the centre of Intime City Commercial District, but the layout and generally respected atmosphere of nearly spa-like calm, which is supported by the materiality of the place, ensures that one’s ability to do something quiet like read remains in tact no matter how many people come in to order coffee.
Covering a modest 65 square metres, the coffee shop stands two storeys high, which is part of what lends certain spaces to an extra quiet atmosphere. Knowing that different people visit coffee shops for different reasons, designs intentional created some spaces that are more conducive to groups that want to talk, and some, slightly removed, that have a singular comfortable but isolated seat for, say, someone who would like to enjoy a coffee and study outside of their desk at home without interruption.
Another interesting element of the shop is that, despite its aura of a spa that is flooded in natural daylight, all of the lighting on the top floor of DaoDao Coffee, and most on the bottom floor except near the windows, is actually artificial. The intention was to used clean white LED lights and light wood that reflects well but not too harshly in order to create a gentle glow that resembles daylight as closely as possible.
Even though the designers were aiming to establish different spaces for different people and purposes, they hesitated to actually divide space; they didn’t want to create a cubicle-like scenario that might make anyone feel isolated. That’s why you see structures change and seat or table make ups vary from place to place. The division is mental and visual, based more on atmosphere and common sense functionality than in being told which area is separated by which purpose.
The light wood materiality that encompasses most of the shop was a choice made for more than just its ability to reflect light in ideal amounts. The goal was to create a calming space and provide some contrast to the dark metal frames and support details, as well as the artistic looked punched metal panels that do give the space a touch more physical privacy than others.
In contrast to all the seating space present on the top floor, the first floor is slightly more open concept and easier for fast movement. This is where people on the go come in simply to grab refreshment and leave, or where tired shoppers sit on the stools by the window for a brief moment until their friends arrive to meet them and they move elsewhere within the shop or perhaps move on all together.
This side bar provides customers and shoppers a stunning view of the square just outside the shop’s windows. In fact, the draw of having such a vantage point while one rests with a drink for a few brief moments is often what draws otherwise fast paced individuals through the doors to pause and breathe before continuing about their day. Plus, the coffee is great!
For those who venture upstairs and stay much longer, there is a self service desk where customers can fetch and serve lemonade and different coffee and drink ingredients free of charge, simply to encourage them to stay as long as they please. The owners regard this as beneficial even if a person only buys one drink because the space is designed to be enjoyed and shared and perhaps they will feel encouraged to come back another time.
For those who truly are seeking a place outside home that is much more cozy and private, but without being totally devoid of other people, there is a singular seat in a quiet corner. This is understood to be for someone who wishes to concentrate even though they wanted to enjoy the world and some public space while they’re at it.

Photos by ARCH-EXIST

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Flavin Architects renovates Bostonian residential plot to create the Natural Mid-Century Home for a busy family

By • Jun 10, 2019

In the quiet suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts, just out of reach of the city noise, creative architects at Flavin Architects recently completed a renovation project called Natural Mid-Century Home, in which they overhauled a 1950s house to boast modern amenities and layouts with all the charm subtle kitsch of its original version’s era.

Weston is a small town just off the borders of Boston and it is home to many houses that were designed and built by big names in the architectural world between the 1930s and 1950s. Now that the street scape has started to change and those houses have experienced enough wear and tear to need updating, contemporary design teams face an interesting dilemma: do they wipe out what they see to give families the modern homes they need, or do they stay true to the mid-century origins of the building?

In this case, the designers and new owners alike decided for a blend of the two options. While they did choose to quite heavily renovate the original 1958 house to make a home with more physical longevity, they also opted to give it a structure and decor style that clearly hearken back to that time, so the whole place has a modernized mid-century twist.

The owners also had one other special request that resulted in a particularly unique finished product. Having previously lived in Hawaii, they wished to have an outdoor patio space that is reminiscent of their terrace there. Designers opted to use materials that complimented the land, making the patio blend well into both the plot and the living room it extends off of within the interior, making it the perfect open-air transitionary space.

Designers also chose to work with the land in particular ways because the home’s plot is on a small slope. Rather than digging into the ground to anchor a patio, they built a natural rock foundation to create a level surface on which to resurrect the newest parts of their mid-century inspired haven.

Much like the original house and many houses of that time, this new building resembles the ever so common split level in some ways. Once you’ve arisen from the entry, however, things get much more open concept in a way that is far more contemporary and allows good flow of movement, energy, and natural sunlight from stunningly large new energy efficient windows.

Contrary to fully storied houses, the main living spaces in this building sit on the ground level that requires you to rise from the sizeable entry, while the private spaces like bedrooms and master bathrooms are below, lower down the slope. This gives the family a calming sense of privacy while letting the social spaces where guests will visit enjoy deeply sunny afternoons.

For the most part, the house is heavy in a beautifully stained wood that was locally sourced to help it blend, once again, into its surroundings. The shapes and lines chosen for furnishings and finishes, however, are one place where that iconic mid-century sort of “mod” style begins to show through. Beyond that, things are kept quite clean and minimalist, giving the atmosphere a sense of perfectly blended modern nostalgia.

Under the brand new (but definitely vintage styled) slate floor, which has a lovely, kitschy purple-green hue to it, designers also installed a modern update in the form of radiant heat. In combination with the passive heating and cooling of the floor to ceiling glazed windows and the ability of the terrace doors to open one wall entirely, these systems are quite environmentally low impact.

Overall, the house is afforded a sense of having transformed and adapted to its surroundings and new owners’ generation, rather than having lost its authentic charm and been overhauled without regard for its history.

Photos by Nat Rea Photography

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Dodged House, created by Leopold Banchini + Daniel Zamarbide, is a contemporary marbled haven

By • Jun 7, 2019

In the heart of Lisbon, Portugal, a uniquely contemporary home was recently completed by Leopold Banchini + Daniel Zamarbide to combine the beauty of marble with the sweet simplicity of minimalism.

Dodged House was built in one of the countless abandoned spaces that resulted from Portugal’s past decade of economic crisis. Cities like Porta and Lisbon itself became home to closed down buildings and ruined structures that intrigued the international community because of the beauty and potential their original traditional architecture maintained.

With a great sense of southern romanticism, this particular design team decided to revamp a dilapidated building in Lisbon in order to create a shockingly but wonderfully modern looking home within the walls of something historical with need for a new lease on life. As with most others in the area, the renovation was completed with the utmost reverence for the building’s historical and spatial context.

Mimicking the typical architecture in the area, the facade of this building remains quite closed, concealing most of the interior from the prying eyes of the busy city streets outside. At the same time, large, beautiful windows have been added in certain spaces to open the space up and signify the new life the building has been given. At the same time, it gives new owners a stunning view of the city streets as they come back to life.

In addition to paying tribute to the history of the building itself and the surrounding streets, Dodged House is also an homage to the particular style of modernity established by architect Irving Gill; a style often mimicked and harnessed in modern Portuguese architecture when new structures are built.

Inside, the house is quite unique indeed, especially for the area. While the opaque facade outside might be somewhat typical, designers made the inside all about space. Hardly any opaque barriers exist inside the outer walls; instead, rooms and spaces of different function are separated by bright, clear glass. The home takes full advantage of the building’s generous height, expanding upward without growing in width and interrupting the original frame or land it was afforded.

While the void of the interior stretches high, the designers did take advantage of the small original courtyard outside to give it a little more natural space despite the calm, ethereal feeling of the otherwise quite closed off home. A spinning glass door gives easy visual and physical access, blending the two areas beautifully and saving the interior from feeling too closed off.

The house boasts three bedrooms which are arranged within four superposed floors; these look like layers of the house stacked one on top of the other. The materiality on each is simple and helped keep the renovation affordable. The tiles and stones featured in the walls, furniture, and floors were all sourced locally. The presence of concrete contrasts cleanly with that of white marble.

The beauty of the inner area, including the lovely quiet space that is the home library, is only bolstered further by the contrast between its shining new modernity and the fact that the facade outside has been largely left in its original, historical state. A light cleaning to extend its life did nothing to take away its status as a reminder of Lisbon’s history amidst what is now a fast changing and ever modernizing cityscape.

Photos by Dylan Perrenoud

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Remedy Partners Offices redesigned by Amenta Emma Architects for comfort and growth

By • Jun 7, 2019

In the bustling downtown core of Norwalk, Connecticut, the brand new Remedy Partners Offices were recently provided a refreshing facelift by innovative design teams at Amenta Emma Architects.

Remedy Partners is a healthcare technology company that provides all kinds of specialized goods and services to health professionals and facilities in the surrounding area. Their old offices were not longer the kind of flexible, fast paced environment they wished to provide their own employees on a daily basis, so they opted for an update that might diversify and streamline things for the better.

Employees at Remedy Partners have need of flexible, free flowing spaces and a number of different settings that will serve different functions for their quick paced jobs throughout the day. The primary goal of designers was to give all workers present, no matter their role, a place to work that feels efficient and yet comfortable and familiar, almost second nature.

In addition to feeling comfortable, designers also wanted to create a space full of gentle visual stimulation that might help employees feel motivated to produce their best work. They oped to create shared spaces that facilitate easy teamwork and collaborative time, but also placed value on quieter, more private spaces for those people who need some solid individual time to put their heads down and get to work at their own pace.

Long tables, sofa booths, individualized desks, and quiet rooms, all furnished in calming neutrals and with a blend of natural and industrial materials, provide these diverse workspaces. No matter the kind of worker you are, nor the kind of space that helps you excel the best, you’ll find it easily and accessibly within these offices.

At Remedy Partners, employees are not anchored to one singular spot to do their jobs. They might claim an assigned space but, should they feel that a change of scenery or setup might benefit their work, they’re free (and even encouraged) to seek that out for the sake of their productivity.

In terms of aesthetic, designers sought to establish harmony and balance in all senses. For example, taking inspiration from places like the New York Public Library, these offices were built to feel open and airy but also private and cozy if and when necessary. Within that dynamic, a rugged and industrial feeling scheme in the communal spaces contrasts seamlessly with softer and more comfortable quiet spaces furnished with cozy armchairs and relaxing nooks.

In efforts to take the concepts of motivation, productivity, and calm to all different levels, the office even contains a “no phone zone”. Visually, this space is separated from others in the office through aesthetic, but it’s actually also separated acoustically to drown out the bustle of the more public group work spaces. The “no phone zone” is modelled after the quiet spaces found in places like college libraries and is often used for anything from solitary work to group collaboration or even small presentations.

Photos by Robert Benson Photography

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TTK Represents completes update on Midcentury Getaway with a fantastic sense of mod style

By • Jun 6, 2019

Under the beautiful, bright sun of Joshua Tree in California, design teams at TTK Represents have completed a fun, stylish updating project on an old home, the newly named Midcentury Getaway.

From the very beginning of the project’s plans, designers prioritized creating a unique combination of classic midcentury minimalism, lovely bright and natural light, and sweeping view of the deserts surrounding the house; the kind of views that can truly only be found in Joshua Tree.

The original house, which was built in 1961, was a standard midcentury desert home situated not far from downtown Joshua Tree. The plot it stands in affords the house lovely views of a close by national park and surrounding valley areas. These stunning natural views through the windows contrast wonderfully with the sense of chic flair one encounters on the inside.

Covering 1,307 square feet, the Midcentury Getaway house can be easily distinguished by its recognizable brise-soleil. This is the stunning cutout concrete work that provides a sort of privacy screen and provides shade to the patio and even part of the inner living space through the large front window, preventing the space from heating up too much in the desert sun.

The house is a simple L-shape but its interiors are still quite open concept and free flowing, without harsh divisions of space. This helps keep things nice and bright while the colour schemes and decor give the place a cozy feeling. Perhaps the most notable feature in the living room is a wood burning fireplace, faced so that it overlooks the patio and it’s lovely desert view.

Next to the fireplace, which keeps the house warm on those surprisingly cool desert nights, the house actually features a rectangular cutout in the wall specifically designed to store firewood. When wood is placed there, it suits well with the little wooden writing desk fitted in perfectly to its own window, where the view can inspire whatever work is being done on the desktop.

Past the living room, with its mod looking, midcentury style furniture and colour pops, is a cozy dining nook and an efficient looking, minimalist style kitchen. Walnut, which can be seen in furnishings dotted throughout the house, is featured here again in the custom made cabinets, which contrast nicely with the quartz countertops.

Past the common spaces, there are two bedrooms- a master and a guest suite- and a bathroom. Beyond that, around the back of the house, sits a unique “guest pod”. Depending on the dwellers’ needs, this might serve as an additional bedroom or perhaps some kind of studio, art space, or writer’s retreat.

The master bedroom features the same kind of bright floor-t0-ceiling sliding doors as the living, each leading to sunny patios. On days when the doors must stay closed for weather, the room still gets plenty of light thanks to a long rectangular window set into an intriguing textured wall. In the master bathroom, to the side, radiant heating warms the space from the floor up to combat the cold of desert nights and the winter season.

Photos by Chris Menrad

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Architects at Nico van der Meulen renovate the 12th century, Italian Stone Guardhouse

By • Jun 6, 2019

In the luscious valley surrounding Umbira in Italy, architectural and design teams at Nico van der Meulen recently transformed a 12th century guardhouse into a charming family farmhouse with a sense of historical charm. The Stone Guardhouse is a beautifully sprawling blend of traditional local culture and modern living.

Once a defence fortress in the area, the Stone Guardhouse is now a breathtaking luxury family residence in the Umbrian valley. In order to pay proper homage to the history of the building and its local area, designers kept the basic structure of the building largely untouched, maintaining its original facade as best they could as well except in places of great wear.

Part of the reason designers sought so strongly to leave the Guardhouse’s structure as authentic as possible is its proximity to ancient Roman ruins. Heavy construction on one historical structure might affect the safety of others close by as it change the traditional visual fabric of the area. In fact, approval processes for the plans for this project, which was as un-intrusive as possible, took almost three years to complete!

In the end, a few minimal additions were approved but they were kept conservative and topical. Even so, these offered designers an opportunity to provide certain inner areas of the new farmhouse a little more light. Architects were also able to open out a connecting courtyard between the two main buildings of the Stone Guardhouse, near which parts of a brand new kitchen sit.

This courtyard became the home of a stunning lanai where a comfortable swimming pool stretches. Where these new areas were created, interventions were done in a way that kept design and construction teams mindful of the local history and sensitive of the building’s context.

Another addition was added not far off in the form of a pleasing looking steel staircase. This sits in a spatial void and provides a simple physical link between the ground floor living areas, where the flat-roofed kitchen sits, and the upper area featuring a master suite, guest bedroom, study, and even a painter’s studio.

All across the Stone Guardhouse’s facade, the building received some maintenance care to keep it in good condition so it will last. The original stonework where wear and tear had taken its toll over time was carefully rebuilt (and the same was done for the bits of stonework in the interior as well). In any places where new stone was added, teams took care to source it un-intrusively from the immediate area, keeping the facade and general structure in proper context regarding history and locale.

Where possible, the timber trusses and beams stretching across the interior wooden ceilings were recycled and repurposed. The contrast between the fresh wood and the old stone creates a comfortable and warm atmosphere at the same time as the visual style is quite eclectic and full of historical character. Black steel and raw concrete enhance the sense of a soft, natural palette.

The furniture and art pieces that were carefully selected for the interior spaces follow the same colour scheme. This was intentional in order to create a sort of cohesive sense of calm brightness throughout the entire stone building. Overall, the project was completed with respect for history and patience with the need for care and authenticity.

Photos provided by the architects.

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The Ribeirão Preto Residence by Perkins+Will São Paulo

By • Jun 5, 2019

Amidst the abundant greenery of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, a stunning rectangular home blends beautifully into the natural environment surrounding it. The Ribeirão Preto Residence by Perkins+Will São Paulo  features a beautiful green rooftop that makes the dwelling look like it grew right out of the land.

Besides the lush grass covering the whole top of one roof, the most notable feature of the house is undoubtedly its dramatic looking, rectangular cantilevered roof, which provides shade to several areas of the house and yard, including an equally impressive pool that overhangs in another rectangular volume, just like the main portion with the green roof.

Another notable feature about the house is its stunning and seamless feeling indoor-outdoor layout and connection. The interior of the main living spaces is quite open concept already and that theme is actually extended beyond the home’s border in the way stunning full glass doors slide open entirely to merge spots like the living room with the sunny patio outside, creating flow.

Initially, besides making sure that the home would be stylish and yet suitable for a young family with kids, designers’ biggest challenge was working on a plot of land with a natural slope. Though not dramatic, the slope still changes the landscape enough to require special consideration in building and design.

Intent on being as respectful of the countryside as possible, designers opted to structure the house so that it works with the slope, rather than cutting into it and interrupting the natural landscape in the area. This is what inspired the home’s two volume L-shape. One volume contains the public spaces where guests might be entertained while the other houses private spaces with their own connection to the sunny outdoors.

In terms of materiality, the Ribeirão Preto Residence is heavy in concrete dotted with warm wood accents, creating a comforting contrast. Each volume appears as a single solid block of concrete, like a pair of monoliths. The place where the cantilevered roof hangs over the lower volume appears to connect the two parts of the house visually right where they’re actually connected on the inside.

Because the common spaces of the house are situated on the upper block, they’re afforded stunning panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. This arrangement also increases the privacy of the bedroom spaces, creating a sense of relaxation and pleasant disconnect in the private rooms. This isn’t to say, however, that they feel secluded; every room in the house has open access to the fresh gardens surrounding it, after all! Designers were positively intent on building a strong relationship between the home and nature.

Wooden screens featured in certain places on the home’s facade and within its interior do more than just contribute to the serene aesthetic and provide increase privacy; they also allow for some ventilation in a place that gets very hot in the summer. Together with the lush grass of the green rooftop above the bedrooms and the way the pool extends towards the slope to disappear into the tropical foliage at once end, the whole area within and surrounding the house feels almost spa-like.

Photos provided by the architects.

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House in Silhouette by Atelier red+black

By • Jun 4, 2019

In the beautiful, sprawling suburbs of Berwick, Australia, innovative designers and architects at Atelier red+black recently completed a family home, the House in Silhouette, that is nothing short of stunning.

The site upon which the house sits is an impressive slope of 1.6 acres. It sits on the edge of a city, close enough for great access to amenities, but far enough outside the busy limits to feel a bit like a calm escape. The size of the plot and the new home that sits upon it is perfect for a small hobby farm, or perhaps ownership of a horse or two!

The natural beauty of this piece of land encouraged designers to build the new home without actually interfering with it as much as they possibly could. They sought to create an experiential dwelling that fit with its slightly countryside setting but that still provides a contemporary influenced lifestyle for the young family moving in.

The result was a durable and comfortable Australian house with a farmhouse chic aesthetic. It possesses two distinct volumes with a recessed hallway link between them and gables outside. The clean looking white painted brick found in the facade is neatly accented with dark steel elsewhere in the frame and furnished features. That playful contrast of light and dark is a theme you’ll find all throughout the home, which helps blend it more subtly into the countryside.

Flexibility, functionality, and free space were central tenets when it came to planning the home itself and how it might be used. A sense of luxury was requested for the retired owners, but style, diversity, and simple use were also required for multi-generational extended family who might live there intermittently throughout the year.

As far as bedrooms are concerned, the occasional residence of extended family was accounted for in the smaller gabled wing of the house. Here, three comforting and sizeable bedrooms were built with various branches of the family in mind and set behind sliding doors that can be thrown open for welcoming space and flow or closed off when the wing isn’t being used.

Flexibility within certain spaces was also prioritized during the design and construction process. The goal was to provide all different family members present with the freedom to use the room how they need or please at any given moment in order to create an overarching sense of satisfaction to everyone in the space on any given day.

Designers wanted to be able to present the family with a house that they could somewhat mould, nest into, and make their own over time, rather than just giving them a rigidly divided structure with specific functions limiting the way each room might be used. They wanted to provide open, comfortable rooms that might be used for work, play, study, relaxation or nearly anything else interchangeably.

Views of nature and the presence of light play a large rope in the experience of the home as well. Rooms and windows were purposely situated to ensure that each room in the house gets some kind of green scenery in one direction or another through the high, clear windows. At the back of the house, natural light was actually prioritized so highly that a small “light courtyard” was built specifically to make sure the family room stays adequately bright.

This additional small courtyard was not just wasted space or single function! Designers saw it as a light source and an opportunity for additional garden space! They used the courtyard to incorporate more greenery and also the presence of bluestone, which is a reflection of its natural occurrence in the landscape around the house and Berwick’s history of quarrying the stone in past decades.

Photos by Peter Bennetts

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German Villa Hohenlohe created by PHILIPPARCHITEKTEN for modern living with as much sunlight as possible!

By • Jun 4, 2019

The German named Villa Hohenlohe, which translates to House Phillip, was built by PHILIPPARCHITEKTEN as an impressively cubic dwelling that looks almost like a sculpture sitting near the mountains in Waldenburg, Germany.

Because of its stunning but unique location perched on a small mountain ridge, House Phillip presented both opportunities and challenges to designers and construction teams alike. No matter how the new house might be situated, it was sure to provide views of unparalleled beauty to the North, but it also required strong anchoring to an uneven terrain.

Designers knew immediately that they view was paramount, so one of the first features they incorporated into the home was the central glazed and frameless window setting that appears to make an entirely see-through wall along one side of the home’s main “cube”. This gives the rooms directly inside plenty of natural sunlight and enhances the concept of living in harmony with nature, blending it right into the home experience and visual.

As they developed beyond these main windows, designers envisioned the basic structure of what they were building to be like a cube encased in a glass box. Inside, to offset the sleek materiality of the facade and the streamlined shapes throughout, comfort is added to the common spaces through elm wood detailing and furnishings. This lovely neutral finish travels through out the kitchen, across the staircase, and into the upper levels of the cube.

Following the wood upward, and cantilevered top floor give the appearance that the private spaces are almost floating lightly above the glass box of the bright ground floor. In a very unique act of space usage, a long hallway with impressive width stretches from one side of the upper floor all the way to the other, doubling as a space in which the kids can play games.

This central upper hallway also boasts almost 15 metres of closet space built into the walls, giving the home generous storage, even for its size; a particular bonus for a large family. This isn’t the only feature that’s fit for fast paced family life. The cube’s main entrance is quite grand and stately but, in order to keep it that way for visitors, you’ll find the “dirt trap” just off to the side.

The first trap is a casual family entrance that’s equipped a little better for things like rain covered jackets and little muddy shoes. The space features a locker for each child in the family to store their daily outwear in, helping to keep them organized in the mornings and evenings and contain clutter as much as possible from spilling into the main entrance and living room. The first trap even features its own sink for hand washing!

We’ve already gushed liberally about the presence of smooth, light elm wood, but the living room brings in several other complementary elements in terms of materiality. Here, you’ll also find light grey Spanish sandstone amidst the wood and other finely finished white surfaces. These mimic the white faced concrete walls in the home’s cubic face and create a sense of consistency.

The final point on the complete sentence of nature’s inclusion in the home’s plans and respect for the scenery around it is the old pear tree rooted right outside the entrance. Its warped, authentic shape that constitutes part of the natural history of the land provides the yard with some shade no hot days and softens the edges of the cube to blend even more with the mountainside.

Photos by Oliver Schuster

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